Elevate II by Anthro

 

The Elevate II by Antho falls between the mid to higher-end tier desk base. Even though it travels at a quick 1.7″ per second, while generating a moderate 68db (decibel) noise level (not quiet, but not grinding loud).

One of our major concerns with this desk is that when we do ergonomic assessments for our corporate clientele there are so many people that are having to type at an awkward posture because their workstation is too high for them. The Elevate II desk travels between 28″ and 47″ which is not low enough for a very large workforce. In an ideal situation you should be typing at an “L” shape, thus your elbow should line up with your keyboard. based on a standard chair cylinder & seat pan height 28″ desk is good for someone between 5’10” and 6’2″ tall. Anyone shorter will need to buy a keyboard tray. Our secondary concern is that the weight capacity is rated for 150 lbs, which folks with numerous monitors, a CPU holder etc, can come close to the limit fairly easy.

We do like the feature of the cable tray for cable management and the “Tilt & Go” wheels that makes it easier to move if needed.

ellivate II

Cost: Starting at $1,088 at Global Industries

Features:
• 28” to 47″ electric height adjustability range
• Travel speed is 1.7” per second
• 150 lbs distributed load bearing capacity per table (including work-surface)
• Available in two widths (48″ and 60″) and two depths (23.25″ and 29″) to fit your equipment and your space.
• “Tilt and go” wheels at the back of each foot make it easy to move the table when you need to rearrange your space or access the back of your equipment. Just lift the front of the work-surface and roll the table into place.

Warranty:
Lifetime Warranty against manufacturing defects on the table; two-year warranty on legs and electrical system. Cords and plugs are not warranted

Pros:
– They have very nice customer service people at Anthro.
– The travel speed is above the standard

Cons:
– Too expensive to compete with the new technology and features coming out in 2014.
– Lowest setting is 28″ (too high for a large number of the workforce).

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